JavaScript Articles …

Clearing Web Notifications Permissions in Chrome

When implementing features which leverage HTML5 Web Notifications, specifically in Chrome, it can be rather convenient to have the ability to clear notification permissions from the host for which the feature is being implemented.

As would be expected, Chrome allows for easily managing any setting; however, one needs to navigate through quite a few of Chrome’s settings in order to locate Web Notification permissions, the path to which being:
Settings > Show advanced settings… > Content Settings > Notifications > Manage Settings…

Navigation of settings can be simplified by using Chrome’s Search box, which allows for quickly navigating to any specific setting:

While Chrome’s settings Search feature is quite useful, it still requires more interactions then desired. Fortunately, there is an even simpler approach for quickly accessing a specific setting, in this case, Notifications.

Simplifying Clearing Web Notification Permissions

Web Notification Settings can be directly accessed for all hosts via the following path:
chrome://settings/contentExceptions#notifications

As with any URL protocol, the above path can be bookmarked, allowing for easy and convenient management of Notifications.

Bookmarking Chrome Settings

While the focus here may be on the topic of managing Web Notification settings, it is important to note that any Chrome setting can be bookmarked as a convenience shortcut for quickly navigating to any given setting. For instance, Chrome’s cache setting can be bookmark at:
chrome://settings/clearBrowserData

Then, commonly used settings can be accessed simply from their respective bookmarks:

Function Modules in RequireJS

Having leveraged RequireJS as part of my preferred client-side web stack for some time now, I find it rather surprising how often I recall various features from the API docs which I have yet to use, and how they may apply to a specific solution I am implementing.

One such feature is the ability to define a module as a function. While at first this may seem a rather basic feature, and indeed it is, there are quite a few practical purposes in which returning a function as a module definition can prove useful.

Function Modules

As one may expect, returning a function as a Module in RequireJS is rather straight-forward. For example, a simple random function can be defined as a module as follows:

Then, the function module can simply be invoked as follows:

Function Modules as Factories

Perhaps a more practical example of implementing a function module is in the context of a Factory Method.

For instance, a function module can be used as a convenient means of creating a specific type of object on a clients behalf based on certain conditions.

Take (an intentionally simple) example of a function module which, given a specific role type, returns a corresponding view implementation (in this example, a Backbone View) for an Editor feature:

Client code can then simply invoke the factory in order to retrieve the appropriate Editor view implementation based on the specified role type:

Defining modules as functions which serve as factory methods can help simplify client code implementations, as the responsibility of determining the type of object to create, configure, etc., can be delegated to a dedicated object; thus allowing for simpler designs which better facilitate code reuse, testing, and maintenance.

As a general rule of thumb, I typically reserve implementing modules as functions for cases in which a package level method would be appropriate, or for factory implementations. However, there are other scenarios in which function modules may apply, and so they are certainly worth noting.

You can fork the above example here.

Fluent APIs and Method Chaining

Of the vast catalog of Design Patterns available at our disposal, often times I find it is the simpler, less prominent patterns which are used quite frequently, yet recieve much less recognition; a good example of which being the Method Chaining Pattern.

Method Chaining

The Method Chaining Pattern, as I have come to appreciate it over the years, represents a means of facilitating expressiveness and fluency when used articulately, and mere convenience in it’s less sophisticated use-cases.

Design Considerations

When considering Method Chaining, one should take heed not to simply use the pattern as merely syntactic sugar from which writing fewer lines of code can be achieved; but rather, Method Chaining should be used, perhaps more appropriately, as a means of implementing Fluent APIs which, in turn, allow for writing more concise expressions. By design, such expressions can be written, and thus read, in much the same way as natural language, though they need not be the same from a truly lexical perspective.

The resulting terseness afforded by Method Chaining, while convenient, is in most cases not in-of-itself a reason alone for leveraging the pattern.

Implementation

Method Chaining, when considered purely from an implementation perspective, is perhaps the simplest of all design patterns. It’s basic mandate simply prescribes returning a reference to the object on which a method is being called (in most languages, JavaScript in particular, the this pointer).

Consider the following (intentionally contrived) example:

As can be seen, implementing Method Chaining requires nothing more than simply having methods return a reference to this.

API Simplicity

Method Chaining is typically used when breaking from traditional Command Query Seperation (CQS) principles. The most common example being the merging of both getters (Queries) and setters (Commands). I especially like this technique, as, aside from being very easy to implement, it allows for an API to be used in a more contextual manner from the developers perspective as oppossed to that specified by the API designer’s preconceptions of how the API will be used. For example:

As can be seen, the message method serves as both a getter and setter, allowing users of the API to determine how the method should be invoked based on context, as well as affording developers the convenience of needing only to remember a single method name. This technique is used quite heavily in many JavaScript libraries and has undoubtedly contributed to their success.

We could further expand on this concept by determining a method’s invocation context based on the arguments provided, or the types of specific arguments, thus, in turn, merging various similar methods based on a particular context.

An important design recommendation to consider is that if you are writing an API which violates CQS (which is quite fine IMHO), as always, API consistency is important, thus all getters and setters should be implemented in the same manner.

Fluency

As was mentioned, in most cases, Method Chaining is leveraged to facilitate APIs which are intended to be used fluently (e.g. an Internal DSL). Such implementations typically provide methods which, by themselves, may have little meaning; however, when combined, allow for writing expressions which are self-descibing and make logical sense to users of the API.

For example, consider the way one might describe a Calendrical Event:

Vacation, begins June 21st, ends July 5th, recurs Yearly.

We can easily implement a Fluent API such that the above grammar can be emulated in code as follows:

The same methods can also be chained in different combinations, yet yield the same value:

Given the above example, we could further improve on the fluency of the implementation by adding intermediate methods which can, by themselves, simply serve to aid in readability, or, provide an alternate modifier for chaining:

When implementing Fluent APIs, we can design such that different logical chaining combinations can yield the same result, thus affording users of the API the convenience of determining the most appropriate expressions based on context or personal preference, even grammatically so. Illogical chaining combinations can be handled by either throwing an exception, or they can simply be ignored based on the context of a preceding invocation – though, of course, one should aim to avoid designs which allow for illogical chaining.

The Ubiquitous Example – jQuery

While Method Chaining and Fluent APIs, as with most design patterns, are language agnostic, in the JavaScript world perhaps the most well known implementation is the jQuery API; for example:

In addition to jQuery, there are numerous additional JavaScript Method Chaining and Fluent APIs of note, Jasmine in particular has a very expressive API which aligns excellently with it’s design goals. The various libraries which implement the Promises/A spec also provide very clear and concise Fluent APIs.

Concluding Thoughts

Over the years I have leveraged Method Chaining to facilitate the design of Fluent APIs for various use-cases. The two patterns, when combined, can be especially useful when designing Internal DSLs; either third-party libraries, or APIs specific to a particular business domain.

Pseudo-abstraction in Backbone

As has been mostly disseminated, JavaScript, being a dynamic, prototypal language, affords developers the ability to design outside the rigid confines inherent to statically typed languages. Interestingly, perhaps even somewhat paradoxically, this same flexibility also allows for programmatically simulating specific features commonly found in statically typed languages, if desired.

While JavaScript does not have a traditional type system, nor does it provide traditional constructs by which user defined types are specified, it is still, necessarily so, a common and desirable design goal to implement a system with the notion of classes in order to provide data types which encapsulate domain logic and facilitate reuse; both of which being key design attributes which help mitigate the complexity of large applications.

Nearly all JavaScript MV* frameworks provide such facilities, and do so in a consistent and convenient manner; most of which allowing for practical circumvention of the prototype system almost entirely. It is also worth noting that while most libraries themselves are generally implemented in the succinct and terse, large applications typically call for a more traditional object oriented design, while also being prudent to do so in alignment with the conventions and idioms particular to JavaScript itself.

Abstraction

At times it will be necessary to design a system with reusable abstractions. In fact, it is quite hard to imagine a modern SPA of even marginal complexity as being maintainable without some level of base class functionality.

For instance, it can be particularly useful to implement base Models and Collections which provide general functionality common amongst all Models and Collections; such as the parsing and appropriate routing of service API exceptions to error callbacks, and successful service results to success callbacks, and so forth.

Since such base classes generally do not provide any concrete behaviors themselves (hence the abstraction), they are of considerable value, specifically when reused amongst various large scale, distributed projects; and, from a design perspective, it is often important for one to ensure such classes are only used as intended.

While one can convey the intended usage of a base class easily enough simply by means of comments alone, indicating their usage as such (and that is quite fine if you prefer), it is also just as easy to ensure base classes are only used as intended programmatically by implementing a simple conditional which checks an instance’s constructor against the base class’ constructor function. For example (in the context of backbone, though any framework applies):

Then, one can simply extend the base class, invoking defaults as needed:

Concluding Thoughts

Like many in the JavaScript community, I, too, am of the opinion that JavaScript should not be made to reflect that which is common to other languages simply for the sake of familiararity; but rather, one should be prudent to leverage the flexiblity inherent to the language itself, and this example serves as a demonstration of how such flexibility can be utilized to provide what a specific design calls for at the discretion of the developer.

Simplifying Designs with Parameter Objects

Recently, while reading the HTML5 Doctor interview with Ian Hickson, when asked what some of his regrets have been over the years, the one he mentions, rather comically so as being his “favorite mistake”, also happened to be the one which stood out to me most; that is, his disappointment with pushState; specifically, the fact that of the three arguments accepted, the second argument is now ignored.

I can empathize with his (Hixie’s) frustration here; not simply because he is one of the most influential figures on the web – particularly for his successful work surrounding CSS, HTML5, and his responsibilities at the WHATWG in general – but rather, it is quite understandable how such a seemingly insignificant design shortcoming would bother such an obviously talented individual, especially considering the fact that pushState's parameters simply could not be changed due to the feature being used prior to completion. Indeed, the Web Platform poses some very unique and challenging constraints under which one must design.

While the ignored pushState argument is a rather trivial issue, I found it to be of particular interest as I often employ Parameter Objects to avoid similar design issues.

Parameter Objects

The term “Parameter Object” is one I use rather loosely to describe any object that simply serves as a wrapper from which all arguments are provided to a function. In the context of JavaScript, object literals serve quite well in this capacity, even for simpler cases where a function would otherwise require only a few arguments of the same type.

Parameter Objects are quite similar to that of an “Options Argument” – a pattern commonly implemented by many JavaScript libraries to simplify providing optional arguments to a function; however, I tend to use the term Parameter Objects more broadly to describe a single object parameter from which all arguments are provided to a function, optional arguments included. The two terms are often used interchangeably to describe the same pattern. However, I specifically use the term Options Argument to describe a single object which is reserved exclusively for providing optional arguments only, and is always defined as the last parameter of a function, proceeding all required arguments.

Benefits

Parameter Objects can prove beneficial in that they afford developers the ability to defer having to make any final design decisions with regard to what particular inputs are accepted by a function; thus, allowing an API to evolve gracefully over time.

For instance, using a Parameter Object, one can circumvent the general approach of implementing functions which define a fixed, specific order of parameters. As a result, should it be determined that any one particular parameter is no longer needed, API designers need not be concerned with requiring calling code to be refactored in order to allow for the removal of the parameter. Likewise, should any additional parameters need to be added, they can simply be defined as additional properties of the Parameter Object, irrespective of any particular ordering of previous parameters defined by the function.

As an example, consider a theoretical rotation function which defines five parameters:

Using a Parameter Object, we can refactor the above function to the following:

Should we wish to remove a parameter from the function, doing so simply requires making the appropriate changes at the API level without changing the actual signature of the function (assuming of course, there are no specific expectations already being made by calling code regarding the argument to be removed). Likewise, should additional parameters need to be added, such as a completion callback, etc., doing so, again, only requires making the appropriate API changes, and would not impact current calling code.

Additionally, taking these potential changes as an example, we can also see that with Parameter Objects, implementation specifics can be delegated to the API itself, rather than client code insofar that the provided arguments can be used to determine the actual behavior of the function. In this respect, Parameter Objects can also double as an Options Argument. For example, should the arguments required to perform a 3D rotation be omitted from the Parameter Object, the function can default to a 2D rotation based on the provided arguments, etc.

Convenience

Parameter Objects are rather convenient in terms of there being less mental overhead required than that of a function which requires ordered arguments; this is especially true for cases where a function defines numerous parameters, or successive parameters of the same type.

Since code is generally read much more frequently than it is written, it can be easier to understand what is being passed to a function when reading explicit property names of an object, in which each property name maps to a parameter name, and each property value maps to parameter argument. This can aid in readability where it would otherwise require reading the rather ambiguous arguments passed to a function. For example:

With Parameter Objects it becomes more apparent as to which arguments correspond to each specific parameter:

As mentioned, if a function accepts multiple arguments of the same type, the likelihood that users of the API may accidentally pass them in an incorrect order increases. This can result in errors that are likely to fail silently, possibly leading to the application (or a portion thereof) becoming in an unpredictable state. With Parameter Objects, such unintentional errors are less likely to occur.

Considerations

While Parameter Objects allow for implementing flexible parameter definitions, the arguments for which being provided by a single object, they are obviously not intended as a replacement for normal function parameters in that should a function need only require a few arguments, and the function’s parameters are unlikely to change, then using a Parameter Object in place of normal function parameters is not recommended. Also, perhaps one could make the argument that creating an additional object to store parameter/argument mappings where normal arguments would suffice adds additional or unnecessary overhead; however, considering how marginal the additional footprint would be, this point is rather moot as the benefits outweigh the cost.

A Look at pushState’s Parameters

Consider the parameters defined by pushState:

  1. data: Object
  2. title: String
  3. url: String

The second parameter, title, is the parameter of interest here as it is no longer used. Thus, calling push state requires passing either null or an empty String (recommended) as the second argument (i.e. title) before one can pass the third argument, url. For example:

Using a Parameter Object, pushState could have been, theoretically, implemented such that only a single argument was required:

  1. params: Object
    • data: Object
    • title: String
    • url: String

Thus, the ignored title argument could be safely removed from current calling code:

And simply ignored in previously implemented calls:

As can be seen, the difference between the two is quite simple: the specification for pushState accepts three arguments, whereas the theoretical Parameter Object implementation accepts a single object as an argument, which in turn provides the original arguments.

Concluding Thoughts

I certainly do not assume to understand the details surrounding pushState in enough detail to assert that the use of a Parameters Object would have addressed the issue. Thus, while this article may reference pushState as a basic example to illustrate how the use of a Parameter Object may have proved beneficial, it is really intended to highlight the value of using Parameter Objects from a general design perspective, by describing common use-cases in which they can prove useful. As such, Parameter Objects provide a valuable pattern worth considering when a function requires flexibility.