Test First Workflow – A Short Story

Saturday, February 2nd, 2013

As a depiction of the typical approach taken when solving a problem with Test First practices in mind, below is a brief excerpt from a recent conversation with a collegue who inquired of me as to how one generally goes about solving a problem using Test First methodologies. My explanation was rather simple, and read somewhat like a short story, though I describe it as being more of a step by step process from a Pair Programming perspective.

The general workflow conveyed in my description, while brief, covers the essentials:

  1. We have a problem to solve.
  2. We discuss the problem, asking questions as needed; then dig a bit deeper to ensure we understand what it is we are really trying to solve; and, most importantly, why.
  3. We consider potential solutions, identifying those most relevant, evaluating each against the problem; then agree upon one which best meets our needs.
  4. We define a placeholder test/spec where our solution will be exercised. It does nothing yet.
  5. We implement the solution in the simplest manner possible, directly within the test itself; the code is quite ugly, and that is perfectly fine, for now. We run our test, it fails
  6. We adjust our implementation, continuing to focus solely on solving the problem; all the while making sure not to become too distracted with implementation details at this point.
  7. We run our test again, it passes. We’re happy, we’ve solved the problem.
  8. We move our solution out of the test/spec to the actual method which is to be implemented, which, until now, had yet to exist.
  9. We update our test assertions/expectations against the actual (SUT). We run our test, it passes.
  10. We’re happy, we have a working, tested solution; however, the implementation is substandard; this has been nagging at us all along, so we shift focus to our design; refactoring our code to a more elegant, performant solution; one which we can be proud of.
  11. We run our test again, it fails. That’s fine, perhaps even preferable, as it verifies our test is doing exactly what is expected of it; thus, we can continue to refactor in confidence.
  12. We adjust our code, continuing to make design decisions and implementation changes as needed. We run our test again, it passes.
  13. We refactor some more, continuing to focus freely, and without worry on the soundness of our design and our implementation. We run our test again, it passes.

Rinse and Repeat…

While the above steps are representative of a typical development work-flow based on Test First processes, it is worth noting that as one becomes more acclimated with such processes, certain steps often become unnecessary. For example, I generally omit Step #5 insofar as implementing the solution within the test/spec itself is concerned; but rather, once I understand the problem to be solved, I then determine an appropriate name for the method which is to be tested, and implement the solution within the SUT itself, as opposed to the test/spec; effectively eliminating the need for Step #8. As such, the steps can be reduced down to only those which experience proves most appropriate.

Concluding Thoughts

Having become such an integral part of my everyday workflow for many years now, I find it rather challenging to approach solving a problem without using Test First methodologies. In fact, attempting to solve a problem of even moderate complexity without approaching it from a testing perspective feels quite awkward.

The simple fact is, without following general Test First practices, we are just writing implementation code, and if we are just writing implementation code, then, in turn, we are likely not thinking through a problem in it’s entirety. Consequently, it follows then that we are also not thinking through our solutions in their entirety, and hence our designs. Because of this, solutions feel uncertain, and ultimately leave us feeling much less confident in the code we deliver.

Conversely, when following sound testing practices we afford our team and ourselves an unrivaled sense of confidence in terms of the specific problems we are solving, why we are solving them, and how we go about solving them; from that, we achieve a concerted understanding of the problem domain, as well as a much clearer, holistic understanding of our designs.

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