You are currently browsing the Eric Feminella posts tagged: javascript

Separation of Concerns: propTypes and Immutable.js

Wednesday, July 25th, 2018

When considering the separation of concerns between Container and Presentational Components (stateful / stateless components), I find it useful to leverage the core concepts of these patterns in order to define a clear boundary between where Immutable data types are used, and where raw JavaScript types are referenced exclusively.

By having a clear separation which compartmentalizes where Immutable types are used and where they are not, team members are afforded the ability to easily determine a components propTypes; as, without having a clear cut-off point, one must give thought as to if a prop passed down to a component will be an Immutable object, or not.

It’s no stretch of the imagination to see how this can quickly lead to code which becomes much harder to maintain than it needs to be. As such, the Container / Presentational Component pattern provides a rather natural boundary for separating these concerns.

Unfortunately; however, while such a boundary may seem rather obvious, it may not always be clearly defined, and this tends to lead to overly complex propType declarations.

For instance, on a number of occasions I’ve seen propTypes declared similar to the following:

Given the above example, it’s obvious that it was unclear to the original implementor (or current maintainer) of SomePresentationalComponent as to what the expected propTypes will ultimately be. In certain cases, it appears someList could be of type array; whereas, in other cases, it could be of type object (e.g. Immutable.List). Likewise, in some cases someItem could be an object, whereas in others it could be an Immutable.Map.

As you can see, this is obviously problematic and indeed a very good candidate for a bug (not to mention, a maintenance headache indeed).

Moreover, it results in all sorts of unnecessary type check permutations before accessing properties. For example, just to check the length of the list:

Likewise, just to get the id of someItem:

At best, this is far from ideal, to say the very least …

Now, obviously the developer could simply define a single propType and refactor Containers which are passing an invalid type; however, it may not always be clear what the type should be, if say, the component is being used by multiple applications to which the developer does not have access, and some of those applications are not using Immutable.js, in which case, it would be best to simply disallow Immutable from the component all together and have consumers of the component update their Containers. In any event, it’s symptomatic of a team not having a clear understanding of what kind of components work exclusively with Immutable data types, and which do not.

Solutions

Fortunately, as one might imagine, there is a couple of very simple solutions to this problem:

  1. Only use Immutable types throughout the entire application.
  2. Segment which components use Immutable types, and which do not.

Now, in some cases the argument for Option #1 may very well be a valid one; however, I find Option #2 to be much more feasible (and flexible) as, it helps to ensure Presentational component are kept pure, and that means only using JavaScript types. For my purposes, this is especially important as I have to maintain a shared library which must limit dependencies as much as possible; and some projects are using Immutable, Redux, etc., and some are not. As always – consider the context.

Pros

By having an internal design contract (or convention) which mandates that Container components are only ever to work with Immutable types and, Presentational components are only ever to be passed JavaScript data types, it becomes much clearer to team members where the boundary is defined, and thus, much easier to maintain a large application over time.

Furthermore, it allows less experienced developers to gradually become acclimated with the React Ecosystem by assigning them tasks focused on presentational features. This can be very useful as it only requires knowledge of core concepts without being inundated with additional libraries and APIs. This approach also affords team members with more experience to focus on the more complex portions of the application (application logic, reducers, containers, etc.).

In addition, destructuring, …rest parameters and related ES6 features can be used much more extensively to simplify implementation when using JavaScript types exclusively, helping to ensure Presentational components are kept intentionally “dumb”. Not to mention, in doing so, testing becomes considerably less complex when working with native JavaScript types – and this is equally important when helping newer developers become productive while still getting up to speed.

And, while not always likely, by reducing our dependency on Immutable.js, we position ourselves for a much more easier migration path in the event we decide to swap out Immutable for another library in the future.

Cons

Arguably, one could be justified in the assertion that only Immutable Data types should be used by both Container and Presentational components (Option #1), and indeed that would be a fair argument if you will be calling toJS() frequently when passing props down to Presentational Components (as there is obviously an inherent expense in doing so).

That being said, there is no reason why one would need to call toJS when passing props to Presentational Components as the Immutable API can be utilized to reduce the given props before being passed down to child components. In such cases, a Higher Order Component can be defined for doing either, which can simplify implementation considerably.

Summary

Like most design decisions, there is rarely a one-size-fits-all approach that perfectly solves any given problem, and what ultimately makes sense in one context, may not always be appropriate in another. However, in the context of when and where Immutable types are used, in most cases it is fair to say there should always be a clear boundary defined, regardless of where that boundary must be.

Polymer Behaviors in ES6

Friday, March 25th, 2016

Being a typical aspect of Object Oriented Design, inheritance, and mixins, provide the means by which modular reuse patterns can be facilitated within a given system. Similarly, Polymer facilitates code reuse patterns by employing the notion of shared behaviors modules. Let’s take a quick look at how to leverage them in Polymer when using ES6 classes.

Implementing Behaviors

Implementing a Behavior is quite simple, just define an object within a block expression or an IIFE, and expose it via a namespace, or module loader of choice:

some-behaviors.js

Then, include the behavior in a corresponding .html document of the same name so as to allow the behavior to be imported by subsequent elements:

some-behavior.html

Extending Behaviors

After having defined and exposed a given Behavior, the Behavior can then be extended from element classes by defining a behaviors getter / setter as follows:

Once the behavior has been extended, simply import the behavior in the element’s template (or element bundle, etc.) and it is available to the template class:

Try it

Implementing Multiple Behaviors

Similar to individual behaviors, multiple behaviors can also be defined and extended:

first-behavior.js

second-behavior.js

In certain cases, I have found it helpful to group related behaviors together within a new behaviors (array) which bundles the individual behaviors together:

Note: As can be seen in the FourthBehavior, a behavior can also be implemented as an Array of previously defined behaviors.

Extending Multiple Behaviors

As with extending individual behaviors, multiple behaviors can also be extended using a behaviors getter / setter. However, when extending multiple behaviors in ES6, there are syntactic differences which one must take note of. Specifically, the behaviors getter must be implemented as follows:

Try it

And that’s basically all there is to it. Hopefully this article helped outline how Polymer Behaviors can easily be leveraged when implementing elements as ES6 classes. Enjoy.

Property Change Observers in Polymer

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

When building Web Components the ability to observe property / attribute changes on custom elements and respond to them accordingly can prove quite useful.

Fortunately, Polymer makes this incredibly easy. Let’s take a quick look …
(note, we’ll be using ES6 here)

Single Property Observers

In it’s most basic form, a Single Property Observer can be defined by simply implementing a method and adding it to the property’s observer configuration:

Now, whenever the property changes, Polymer will automatically invoke the observer method; handily passing two arguments: the updated value, and the previous value:

Try it

Pretty cool, right? It gets even better…

Multi-Property Observers

In addition to Single Property Observers, multiple properties can be observed for changes using the observers array:

The observers array is rather self-explanatory: each item is simply a string representation of the method to be invoked with the observed properties specified as arguments:

Try it.

For more information, see multi-property-observers.

Sub-Property Observers

Similar to Multi-Property Observers, sub-properties can be observed as well (e.g. user.username, or user.account.name, etc.). For instance:

Try it

Deep Sub-Property Observers

As with explicit Sub-Property Observers, (n-level) arbitrary sub-properties can be observed using wildcard notation:

Try it.

Both Sub-Property Observers and Deep Sub-Property Observers differ from Single-Property Observers in that a changeRecord is passed to the observer method as opposed to the updated value. A changeRecord is simply an object which contains the following properties (as per the Polymer Docs):

  • changeRecord.path: Path to the property that changed.
  • changeRecord.value: New value of the path that changed.
  • changeRecord.base: The object matching the non-wildcard portion of the path.

It’s important to keep in mind that Sub-Property, and Deep Sub-Property observations can only be made using either property bindings or the set method.

Array Mutation Observers

Complimentary to Single, Multi, Sub, and Deep Property Observers, Polymer provides Array Mutation Observers which allow for observing Array and Array element properties for changes.

This is where the API requires a little getting used to IMHO, and so I would recommend reading the Docs in detail.

That being said, Array Mutation Observers are quite powerful, for example:

Try it.

When observing Arrays, in order for bindings to reflect properly, Polymer’s Array Mutation Methods must be used. This is quite simple in that the API is the same as that of the corresponding Native Array methods, with the only difference being the first argument is the path to the array which is to be modified. For example, rather than: this.items.splice(...) one would simply use: this.splice('items', ...).

Conclusion

Hopefully this simple introduction to Polymer Observers has demonstrated some of the powerful capabilities they provide. Understanding how each can be implemented will certainly simplify the implementation of your custom elements, therefore leveraging them where needed is almost always a good design decision.

Feel free to explore any of the accompanying examples.

Quick Tip: Backbone Collection Validation

Sunday, January 19th, 2014

Often times I find the native Backbone Collection implementation to be lacking when compared to it’s Backbone.Model counterpart. In particular, Collections generally lack in terms of direct integration with a backend persistence layer, as well as the ability to validate models within the context of the collection as a whole.

Fortunately, such short comings can easily be circumvented due to the extensibility of Backbone’s design as a generalized framework. In fact, throughout my experience utilizing Backbone, I can assert that there has yet to be a problem I have come across which I was unable to easily solve by leveraging one of the many Backbone extensions, or, more often than not, by simply overriding Backbone’s default implementation of a given API.

Validating Collections

Perhaps a common use-case for validating a collection of Models can be found when implementing editors which allow for adding multiple entries of a given form section (implemented as separate Views), whereby each section has a one-to-one correlation with an individual model. Rather than invoke validation on models from each individual view, and manage which model’s are in an invalid state from the context of a composite view, it can be quite useful to simply validate the collection from the composite view which, in turn, results in all models being validated and their associated views updating accordingly.

Assuming live validation is not being utilized, validation is likely to occur when the user submits the form. As such, it becomes necessary to validate each model after their views have updated them as a result of the form being submitted. This can be achieved quite easily by implementing an isValid method on the collection which simply invokes isValid on each model within the collection (or optionally, against specific models within the collection). A basic isValid implementation for a Collection is as follows:

As can be seen in the above example, the Collection’s isValid method simply invokes isValid on it’s models. This causes each model to be re-validated which, in turn, results in any invalid models triggering their corresponding invalidation events, allowing for views to automatically display validation indicators, messages, and the like; particularly when leveraging the Backbone.Validation Plugin.

This example serves well to demonstrate that, while Backbone may not provide everything one could ever ask for “out of the box”, it does provide a design which affords developers the ability to quickly, easily, and effectively extend the native framework as needed.

Simplifying Designs with Parameter Objects

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

Recently, while reading the HTML5 Doctor interview with Ian Hickson, when asked what some of his regrets have been over the years, the one he mentions, rather comically so as being his “favorite mistake”, also happened to be the one which stood out to me most; that is, his disappointment with pushState; specifically, the fact that of the three arguments accepted, the second argument is now ignored.

I can empathize with his (Hixie’s) frustration here; not simply because he is one of the most influential figures on the web – particularly for his successful work surrounding CSS, HTML5, and his responsibilities at the WHATWG in general – but rather, it is quite understandable how such a seemingly insignificant design shortcoming would bother such an obviously talented individual, especially considering the fact that pushState's parameters simply could not be changed due to the feature being used prior to completion. Indeed, the Web Platform poses some very unique and challenging constraints under which one must design.

While the ignored pushState argument is a rather trivial issue, I found it to be of particular interest as I often employ Parameter Objects to avoid similar design issues.

Parameter Objects

The term “Parameter Object” is one I use rather loosely to describe any object that simply serves as a wrapper from which all arguments are provided to a function. In the context of JavaScript, object literals serve quite well in this capacity, even for simpler cases where a function would otherwise require only a few arguments of the same type.

Parameter Objects are quite similar to that of an “Options Argument” – a pattern commonly implemented by many JavaScript libraries to simplify providing optional arguments to a function; however, I tend to use the term Parameter Objects more broadly to describe a single object parameter from which all arguments are provided to a function, optional arguments included. The two terms are often used interchangeably to describe the same pattern. However, I specifically use the term Options Argument to describe a single object which is reserved exclusively for providing optional arguments only, and is always defined as the last parameter of a function, proceeding all required arguments.

Benefits

Parameter Objects can prove beneficial in that they afford developers the ability to defer having to make any final design decisions with regard to what particular inputs are accepted by a function; thus, allowing an API to evolve gracefully over time.

For instance, using a Parameter Object, one can circumvent the general approach of implementing functions which define a fixed, specific order of parameters. As a result, should it be determined that any one particular parameter is no longer needed, API designers need not be concerned with requiring calling code to be refactored in order to allow for the removal of the parameter. Likewise, should any additional parameters need to be added, they can simply be defined as additional properties of the Parameter Object, irrespective of any particular ordering of previous parameters defined by the function.

As an example, consider a theoretical rotation function which defines five parameters:

Using a Parameter Object, we can refactor the above function to the following:

Should we wish to remove a parameter from the function, doing so simply requires making the appropriate changes at the API level without changing the actual signature of the function (assuming of course, there are no specific expectations already being made by calling code regarding the argument to be removed). Likewise, should additional parameters need to be added, such as a completion callback, etc., doing so, again, only requires making the appropriate API changes, and would not impact current calling code.

Additionally, taking these potential changes as an example, we can also see that with Parameter Objects, implementation specifics can be delegated to the API itself, rather than client code insofar that the provided arguments can be used to determine the actual behavior of the function. In this respect, Parameter Objects can also double as an Options Argument. For example, should the arguments required to perform a 3D rotation be omitted from the Parameter Object, the function can default to a 2D rotation based on the provided arguments, etc.

Convenience

Parameter Objects are rather convenient in terms of there being less mental overhead required than that of a function which requires ordered arguments; this is especially true for cases where a function defines numerous parameters, or successive parameters of the same type.

Since code is generally read much more frequently than it is written, it can be easier to understand what is being passed to a function when reading explicit property names of an object, in which each property name maps to a parameter name, and each property value maps to parameter argument. This can aid in readability where it would otherwise require reading the rather ambiguous arguments passed to a function. For example:

With Parameter Objects it becomes more apparent as to which arguments correspond to each specific parameter:

As mentioned, if a function accepts multiple arguments of the same type, the likelihood that users of the API may accidentally pass them in an incorrect order increases. This can result in errors that are likely to fail silently, possibly leading to the application (or a portion thereof) becoming in an unpredictable state. With Parameter Objects, such unintentional errors are less likely to occur.

Considerations

While Parameter Objects allow for implementing flexible parameter definitions, the arguments for which being provided by a single object, they are obviously not intended as a replacement for normal function parameters in that should a function need only require a few arguments, and the function’s parameters are unlikely to change, then using a Parameter Object in place of normal function parameters is not recommended. Also, perhaps one could make the argument that creating an additional object to store parameter/argument mappings where normal arguments would suffice adds additional or unnecessary overhead; however, considering how marginal the additional footprint would be, this point is rather moot as the benefits outweigh the cost.

A Look at pushState’s Parameters

Consider the parameters defined by pushState:

  1. data: Object
  2. title: String
  3. url: String

The second parameter, title, is the parameter of interest here as it is no longer used. Thus, calling push state requires passing either null or an empty String (recommended) as the second argument (i.e. title) before one can pass the third argument, url. For example:

Using a Parameter Object, pushState could have been, theoretically, implemented such that only a single argument was required:

  1. params: Object
    • data: Object
    • title: String
    • url: String

Thus, the ignored title argument could be safely removed from current calling code:

And simply ignored in previously implemented calls:

As can be seen, the difference between the two is quite simple: the specification for pushState accepts three arguments, whereas the theoretical Parameter Object implementation accepts a single object as an argument, which in turn provides the original arguments.

Concluding Thoughts

I certainly do not assume to understand the details surrounding pushState in enough detail to assert that the use of a Parameters Object would have addressed the issue. Thus, while this article may reference pushState as a basic example to illustrate how the use of a Parameter Object may have proved beneficial, it is really intended to highlight the value of using Parameter Objects from a general design perspective, by describing common use-cases in which they can prove useful. As such, Parameter Objects provide a valuable pattern worth considering when a function requires flexibility.

Quick Tip: Chrome Developer Tools Shortcut Keys

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Sometimes it is the more subtle, less obvious features provided by tools which prove to be surprisingly useful. Interestingly, while such features can save developers considerable time and effort, they are often much less apparent, and thus, occasionally overlooked when compared to their main counterparts.

A noteworthy example of some very simple, yet extremely useful features can be found in just a few of the basic Chrome Developer Tools shortcut keys. Below is a brief description of the most convenient shortcuts I find myself using regularly.

Go to Source (Cmd-O)

Perhaps the most useful short-cut available in the sources panel, Cmd-O allows one to quickly search for a specific source file (thanks to @augiemarcello for this one):
Chrome Developer Tools Command-O

Show Functions (Cmd-shift-O)

Another extremely useful feature in the Sources Panel, Cmd-shift-O displays a list of all functions and their corresponding line numbers within the current source file:
Chrome Developer Tools Command-Shift-O

Clear Console (Cmd-K/)

Clears the console when in focus:
Chrome Developer Tools Command-k

Previous/Next Panel (Cmd-[ / Cmd-])

Toggles between Developer Tools Panels (e.g. Elements, Resources, Network, Sources etc.):
Chrome Developer Tools Command-[]

There are quite a few additional shortcut keys available in Chrome Developer Tools, and Jared has done a excellent job of providing a Devtools cheat sheet. I highly recommend trying some of them out; committing to memory those which you find most useful – and sharing them with others as well.